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20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
won. you know, since ronald reagan we no longer have 70% tax rates on the highest income earners. nobody is arguing for that. we're arguing to go back to 39.6%. on health care reform, the president's health care reform was basically a conservative idea put into the national spotlight by democrats and passed by democrats. education reform. even cap and trade is really a republican approach to solving environmental problems. we no longer have anyone saying we don't need to balance the budget. in a lot of ways these conservative ideas have won the day. so republicans are in a place where they moved further and further to the right as the democratic party has amoved further and further to the right. now they're out in the mainstream, and in order to have a meaningful, stark contrast with democrats, they've gone to such a far right place that the american people just aren't comfortable with what they propose. >> i'm encouraged by some of the language i heard coming from some folks on the right. there's still people in conservative circles who are saying we can't compromise our values.
cracking around ronald reagan's feet, the first time he raised taxes. i remember when he said that. >> yes, exactly. well, i think the speaker, i think, is setting the tone, as you saw on the front page, above the fold in "the washington post," you know. call his caucus to task, saying he's got to get the nation's business done. and i think what he said implicitly and probably directly behind the door is, trust me on this. you know, i get it. i understand what we need to do. we're not going to sacrifice our principles and values, but we've got to get the nation's business done. and then when we have a bill kristol coming out and saying, you know, they're all rich guys who live out in hollywood. we can raise their taxes. what an 180-degree turn. >> they're not the small business men. >> you'll probably note this, what an election will do. winning and losing has a consequence. and i think for a lot of republicans right now, given where we were two years ago versus where we are right now, you realize, hey, we're going to have to deal. we're going to have to deal. >> what about the president?
of the major puzzles and challenges for the republican party now as it was a generation ago. ronald reagan in part with the help of jack kemp, a generation ago, found a way to sell supply side economics as a blue collar alternative. to sell it to the common man. that's what reagan and kemp were all about. the republicans lost the ability to do that. they lost the argument once. they're going to have to figure out how to make that argument again because if they're going to say that unleashing the power of the free market is the route forward for the middle class and the working people of america, they need convincing arguments and convincing people to do it. mitt romney, if you look at it from even the slightest distance, was arguably the worst possible carrier of that message. they need somebody else. they need to southern populism or populism from somewhere, but they also need the proof. they need the evidence. and lacking the evidence last time in the election of a week ago, a week or two ago, people went with the -- what they knew, which was the president's belief in the power of govern
income tax? [talking over each other] a big part of it was ronald reagan's in the reform act of 1886 that, you know, increased reductions and what have you. when i got out of school, probably before both of you were born, it was in the middle 20s. and the direction we are going, guys, it will be in the mid- 50s. in the argument of so-called fairness, we are telling, you know, the top few% that pay 43% of all taxes, it is only fair you pay more. i hope it will be a very welcome outcome. connell: largely, i am sure, it is 2% versus 98% when you pull it. it is very popular, the idea of raising taxes on the rich. they favor extending the bush tax cuts except for the wealthy. neil: you assume that the rich guy pay for it. what i would not do at that table, i would not -- about the appetizer. then, what happens is we penalize those who provide -- believe me, i am not one of these, by the way, nothing wrong with that. i just think it is a disjointed argument. one thing romney did get right, although he maybe did not articulate as well as he should have, it is about everyone having a stake in the
that divided government has sometimes done very important things for the country. think of ronald reagan and tip o'neill reforming social security. ron reagan and tip o'neill during the current tax reform. bill clinton and the republican congress doing welfare reform and balancing the budget. we look forward to making this divided government productive for the american people, and we have, as everyone knows, a lot of challenges at the end of the year. i will be meeting with the president and the other leadership on friday to talk about the way forward. we look forward to being a part of the solution to the significant problems. it is my pleasure to turn to our newly elected whip, senator john corn andyn of texas. >> -- senator john cornyn of texas. >> is an honor to serve as the assistant leader on the republican side. we have a lot of very difficult work to do, but we are committed to working with our colleagues across the aisle to solve the nation's urgent problems. we know what those are in the lame duck and we know what those are going forward. there is no mystery about that, nor is
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)